Counter transference

Written by Gladeana in Coaching Tools Transference and Counter Transference are not the easiest of concepts to understand and many new coaches find these difficult.

Counter transference

Contact Us What is Countertransference? Transference and countertransference describe two commonly occurring scenarios within a counseling relationship. Both transference and countertransference represent the manner in which the client acts and feels toward the therapist and vice versa. Transference and countertransference can both be powerful tools in therapy if used appropriately, but can Counter transference be harmful to the therapeutic relationship and process if not recognized and dealt with.

Understanding Transference At its core, transference occurs when feelings that you have for one person are unconsciously redirected to another. It happens every day, in multiple settings, but can prove to be both insightful and problematic in a counseling relationship.

Imagine that you meet someone while grocery shopping who reminds you of a beloved aunt. Without knowing it, you may treat that person kindly, and even engage in more in-depth conversation than you would with a stranger because you are projecting your feelings of your aunt onto this person.

In a counseling relationship, transference gives the counselor an insight into how a client might interact with someone in public. A skilled therapist can both recognize when transference is occurring, and use that transference as a means to guide a therapy session, allowing the client to work through emotions with the therapist that they may not be comfortable discussing with other people.

Countertransference | Definition of Countertransference by Merriam-Webster

How countertransference is used in therapy can make it either helpful or problematic. A counselor may notice him or herself reacting more positively to a client that reminds them of an old friend or colleague, or may take on a more parental tone with a client who reminds the counselor of one of their children.

A skilled therapist can recognize these feelings, and may even bring them up in session. Addressing Countertransference Once countertransference is recognized, it is important that the therapist acknowledge and work through those feelings.

This can take on many shapes, some more problematic than others. A therapist who is under financial stress, or just had an argument with their spouse, may in turn allow those emotions to carry over into the counseling session with an unknowing client.

It is important for the therapist to understand the role that of transference and countertransference, and deal with those emotions in such a way that the core of the counseling relationship is not shattered by these feelings.Comments on countertransference.

What made you want to look up countertransference?Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible). Transference and Counter Transference are not the easiest of concepts to understand and many new coaches find these difficult..

Counter transference

The term transference originates from Psychodynamic Therapy where it is defined as a client’s unconscious conflicts that can cause problems in everyday life.

It is where the individual transfers feelings and attitudes from a person or situation in the past on to a.

In psychoanalytic theory, counter-transference occurs when the therapist begins to project his own unresolved conflicts onto the client. Freud, in , was the first to discuss this topic. Early formulations. The phenomenon of countertransference (German: Gegenübertragung) was first defined publicly by Sigmund Freud in (The Future Prospects of Psycho-Analytic Therapy) as being "a result of the patient's influence on [the physician's] unconscious feelings"; although Freud had been aware of it privately for some time, writing to Carl Jung for example in of the need "to. Countertransference. Counter-transference is defined as “ an ‘abbreviation’ for the totality of our responses to our work—emotional, cognitive, and behavioral—whether prompted by our patients, by the dynamics incumbent to our helping relationships, or by our own inevitable life experiences.

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Find help from our directory of therapists. Transference and Counter Transference are not the easiest of concepts to understand and many new coaches find these difficult.. The term transference originates from Psychodynamic Therapy where it is defined as a client’s unconscious conflicts that can cause problems in everyday life.

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It is where the individual transfers feelings and . a transference reaction of a psychoanalyst or other psychotherapist to a patient; that is, an emotional reaction that is generally a reflection of the therapist's own inner needs and conflicts but also may be a reaction to the client's behavior.

Counter transference

Countertransference, which occurs when a therapist transfers emotions to a person in therapy, is often a reaction to transference, a phenomenon in which the person in treatment redirects feelings.

Countertransference | Definition of Countertransference by Merriam-Webster