Literary analysis of the book i hear america singing by walt whitman

Through the windows—through doors—burst like a ruthless force, Into the solemn church, and scatter the congregation; Into the school where the scholar is studying; Leave not the bridegroom quiet—no happiness must he have now with his bride; 5 Nor the peaceful farmer any peace, plowing his field or gathering his grain; So fierce you whirr and pound, you drums—so shrill you bugles blow. Over the traffic of cities—over the rumble of wheels in the streets:

Literary analysis of the book i hear america singing by walt whitman

This poem is not written according to formal poetry rules; such as end rhyme employed or blank verse unrhymed iambic pentameter the structure upon which the poem is built. One example of this stricter, more formal poetry would be a Shakespearean sonnet.

Free verse does not have regular patterns or arrangements of rhyme and meter. Walt Whitman does not use numerous stanzas in this poem either.

In fact, the poem is one stanza. Walt Whitman is celebrating the everyday life of an average American as he or she goes about his or her daily business and responsibilities. He is showing that happiness, contentment and personal fulfillment are achievable through one being productive and enjoying his daily work.

This is what built America. Whitman conveys this thought in this line: The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam, Therefore, Whitman is showing the reader his attitude toward everyday working Americans as they contribute to society.

“I Hear America Singing”

Whitman does use alliteration in the poem. Alliteration involves words that begin with the same consonant sounds.

These words are used successively in the same line. The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands, Hyperbole: There is a touch of hyperbole or exaggeration in the poem.

Hyperbole, essentially, overstates or overemphasizes something to make a point.

I Hear America Singing by Walt Whitman | Poetry Foundation

In the first line of the poem, Whitman states: I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear, Whitman likens the everyday working lives of average Americans and their words and actions to songs, and even carols.

To him all of this activity is a joyous song, a wonderful carol. Therefore, hyperbole serves to make his point to the reader that what he witnesses before him is something beautiful. He means exactly what he is saying and writing.

He is not using figurative language in the poem. In addition, in this particular poem, he does not employ metaphors.The tone of the poem 'I Hear America Singing' by Walt Whitman is jubilant and happy.

Walt Whitman - Poet | Academy of American Poets

The poem is an expression of celebration of all that he sees that is good about America. He praises the work.

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Whitman opens his poem by telling us he hears all of America singing, and that every person has his or her own song - much like every person has his or her own story to tell.

Summary and Analysis: Inscriptions I Hear America Singing"" Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List The mechanic, the carpenter, the mason, the boatman, the shoemaker, and the woodcutter all join in the chorus of the nation.

Literary analysis of the book i hear america singing by walt whitman

The tone of the poem 'I Hear America Singing' by Walt Whitman is jubilant and happy. The poem is an expression of celebration of all that he sees that is good about America. He praises the work. I Hear America Singing Walt Whitman English Literature Essay.

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Walt Whitman

Disclaimer: life on a farm followed by city life he gathered the societal experiences and attitudes which he wrote about in the book.

The expression “I hear America singing” substitutes “America” for “America people”. The effect of the. I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear, Walt Whitman is America’s world poet—a latter-day successor to Homer, Virgil, Dante, and Shakespeare.

Literary Analysis of Walt Whitman Poems: " I Hear America Singing," and "Beat! Beat! Drums!"